Adam's Pearmain


The Adam's Pearmain apple has dull-red streaks on a yellow or orange flushed background, with greyish-brown russetting making the skin slightly rough. The finely-textured flesh is crisp, tender and slightly dry, with a nutty, sugary flavour. The apples are fragrant.

The tree produces very attractive flowers.

History Notes

Robert Adams from Norfolk submitted this apple to the London Horticultural Society in 1826 under the name of Norfolk Pippin. The apple may have originated, though, in Hertfordshire, where it was called "Hanging Pearmain". The apple was very popular in Victorian England because it stored well. It is less popular now because its muted colour gets blown away by the brighter apples on the grocery store shelves, and its slight dryness which was appealing to tastes back then has gone out of fashion.

Language Notes

The word "pearmain" comes from the French adjective "parmanus", meaning from Parma in northern Italy.