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Charles Ross Apple



A large apple. The skin has a greenish-yellow background with red-orange streaks. The flesh is juicy and sweet.

Cooking Tips

Holds its shape well when cooked, which makes it good for pies. This same characteristic, however, means it's not good for sauces, as it won't collapse into a purée without being bludgeoned.



Storage Hints

This apple sweetens as it stores, but flesh also becomes quite light, almost powdery.


History Notes

This late-Victorian apple was a cross between Cox's Orange Pippin, and Peasgood Nonsuch. It was developed in Berkshire, England prior to 1890 by Charles Ross, who was gardener at Welford Park from 1860-1908. It was originally named the "Thomas Andrew Knight" apple, in honour of the president of the Royal Horticultural Society at the time. Exhibited in 1890. It got an Award of Merit in 1899, and the name was changed to Charles Ross to honour the gardener.

See also:

Pie Apples

Baldwin Apple; Bramley Apples; Calville Blanc d'Hiver; Charles Ross Apple; Criterion Apple; Grange's Pippin Apples; Gravenstein Apples; Holstein Apples; Jazz Apples; King Luscious Apples; Lord Derby Apples; Lubsk Queen Apples; Melrose Apples; Mollie's Delicious Apples; Nova Spy Apple; Pettingill Apples; Pie Apples; Wealthy Apple; White Astrachan Apples

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Citation

Oulton, Randal. "Charles Ross Apple." CooksInfo.com. Published 20 March 2004; revised 25 July 2005. Web. Accessed 12/12/2017. <http://www.cooksinfo.com/charles-ross-apple>.

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