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Crab Apples



Originally, all apple trees were Crab Apple trees, producing small, sour fruit. Over the millennia, we have used selective breeding to produce the large, sweet apples that we now have. Anything over two inches (5 cm) is an "apple." Anything under two inches is a "Crab Apple." Crab Apples may be as small as 1/4 of an inch (1/2 a cm) -- smaller than some berries!

Though Crab Apples can be red, green or yellow, all are very sour. Some are used for jam and jelly making; some are used for cider and Crab Apple wine; some, such as Snowdrift Crab Apples, are so small and fiddly they are best left on the tree for our feathered friends.

Good jelly can be made from Adams, Centennial, Chestnut, Montreal Beauty, Robinson, and Transcendent Crab Apples. Doglo Crabs make a good applesauce and a ruby-red jelly. Hyslops make a deep, orange coloured jelly.

Varieties include Adams, Almey, Centennial, Chestnut, Dolgo, Hyslop, Katherine, Montreal Beauty, Professor Sprenger, Profusion, Radian, Robinson, Royalty, Snowdrift, Transcendent, Van Eseltine and White Angel.

Cooking Tips

Crab Apples are very sour to eat raw, but a good jelly can be made from them. Some Crab Apples contain very good tannin for blending into apple cider to give the cider an edge. Crab Apples can also be pickled.


Crab Apples

Adirondack Crab Apples; Anaros Crab Apples; Atalanta Apples; Bedford Crab Apples; Chipman Crab Apples; Crab Apples; Dawn Crab Apples; Egremont Crab Fair; Florence Crab Apples; Geneva Crab Apples; Hyslop Crab Apples; Montreal Beauty Crab Apples; Nelson County Crab Apples; Osman Crab Apples; Quality Crab Apples; Siberian Crab Apples; Trail Crab Apples; Transcendent Crab Apples; Wickson Crab Apples; Yellow Siberian Crab Apples

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Also called:

Malus sylvestris (Scientific Name)

Citation

Oulton, Randal. "Crab Apples." CooksInfo.com. Published 31 January 2004; revised 27 May 2007. Web. Accessed 12/17/2017. <http://www.cooksinfo.com/crab-apples>.

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