Food Calendar

What's happening when and where in the world of food.

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April

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    April's Fool Day is a day traditionally for playing tricks on others. The tricks are meant to be harmless tricks, aimed particularly at fooling someone into believing something that isn't real.
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    On this day in 1755, Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin was born in France. He wrote the first book about the pleasures of food, published in 1825.
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    Carling Sunday, otherwise known as Passion Sunday, is celebrated in Scotland and in northern England on the fifth Sunday in Lent, two Sundays from Easter. Why's it called Carling Sunday? Why, because Carlings are served, of course.
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    Watch out for the Food Network's new action-packed thriller, "The Pirates of The Carob Bean." Alas, in real life, it doesn't get that exciting for carob. It looks like chocolate and it's marketed like chocolate: but one taste and you know the old saying is true: sometimes beauty is only skin deep.
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    The 17th of April is a good day to learn what Coffee Cake actually is -- and treat yourself and a friend to a slice while you're at it. For those already in the know, you might be surprised to learn what Coffee Cake originally contained.
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    William Keith (aka WK) Kellogg was born 7 April 1860. In 1894, William, together with his brother John discovered Corn Flakes.
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    Palm Sunday marks the day when Jesus reputedly arrived in Jerusalem, being greeted by people waving palm branches. In the Catholic church, Lent includes Palm Sunday and continues up to Maundy Thursday, even if that happens to make more than 40 days in any given year.
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    Bananas made their London Debut on 10 April 1633 in a shop window. It was the shop window of shopkeeper Thomas Johnson, who had a herbalist shop on Snow Hill in the neighbourhood still called Holburn.
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    Passover is a Jewish holiday whose date varies by year in our Gregorian calendar, just as Easter does. In the Jewish lunar calendar, it's always a fixed date: the 15th day of Nissan.
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    Finally, a holiday to celebrate stale bread and melted cheese! Some people say that Cheese Fondue Day should be observed on June 4th. We, however, back those who plump for the April date.
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    Liquorice Day is sponsored by the company called "Licorice International" as a way to promote true liquorice (much liquorice made today is actually flavoured with anise, as opposed to liquorice root.) The day was first held in 2004. .
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    Catherine de Medici was born in Florence, Italy, the daughter of a French princess and one of the heirs of the famed Medici fortune. She married the French Prince Henry, who went on to become the King of France.
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    Maundy Thursday is the Thursday immediately before Easter. This was the day of the last supper, when Jesus washed the feet of his disciples.
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    The date for Good Friday changes wildly every year. A solemn day in the Christian calendar, it marks the day Christ was crucified on the cross by Romans.
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    The 14th of April is the day to treat yourself to a piece of Pecan Pie, and learn all about Pecans right here on CooksInfo.com while you're at it. That being said, we're not at all certain why it's Pecan Day.
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    The Third Saturday in April is celebrated as Damson Day in the Lyth Valley in Cumbria, England, sponsored by the Westmorland Damson Association (established 1996.) At this time of year there, the damson plum trees are in bloom (particularly the locally-favoured damsons, called Witherslack damsons.) Various growers sell products made from damsons such as ice cream, wine, pickles, pies, tarts, ca
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    The 15th of April is Glazed Ham Day. You usually only get to glaze a ham on high holidays such as Christmas and Easter, when the pressure is on: there's 19 other things to juggle in the kitchen, but everyone is going to be inspecting the glazed ham the minute it hits the table.
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    On this day in 1912, the Titanic sunk. The Titanic almost seems like it was one big floating restaurant.
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    Easter Sunday is the day in the Christian calendar when Jesus Christ is believed to have risen from the dead after three days. It is also often just referred as Easter.
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    The 16th of April is Eggs Benedict Day. Yes, the dish called Eggs Benedict can pack a whallop in terms of calories.
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    Many people hate cheeseballs. They are seen as very cheesy, as in "tacky." In fact, "cheeseball" is one of those food words that, like corn (as in "corny"), or "vanilla", has been absorbed into general usage to describe something as being a bit less than exotic or sexy.
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    The date for Easter Monday varies wildly every year. It is the Monday immediately after Easter Sunday.
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    Hare Pie Day takes place in Hallaton, Leicestershire on Easter Monday. It appears to have started in 1770.
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    Easter Tuesday is the day after Easter Monday. In Kraków, Poland it is called Rekawka (meaning Sleeve in English, though it's unclear why it's called that.) People gather around a small hill in Krakow called the Krakus Mound where legend says Krakus, the first prince -- in legend at least -- of Kraków is buried.
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    The 19th of April is Garlic Day. Don't worry about your breath today; no one will notice because everyone else will be eating it too -- apparently.
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    Wow, when's the last time you had Pineapple Upside-Down Cake? Cappuccino Dacquoise, Triple Chocolate Mousse, White Truffle Cheesecake Gateau... as spectacular as all these cakes sound -- and look -- they all have two things in common.
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    The 22nd of April is Jelly Bean Day. The question in most people's minds is, though, is why on earth is it so close to Easter in some years? Who needs any more sugar at this time of year? Maybe it's a reminder to include Jelly Beans in your Easter Candy, or a second chance to get some if your Easter Candy didn't include any -- but this is already the biggest selling time of the year for jelly beans as it is.
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    The Bavarian Beer Purity Law (Reinheitsgebot) is a law that governs what ingredients can be used for beer made in Germany. Many alcohol aficionados, particularly beer enthusiasts, will know about this already.
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    William Shakespeare was born on this day, the 23rd April, in 1564 . On this same date in 1616, 52 years later, he would also die.
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    St George is the Patron saint of England. His flag is a red cross on a white background.
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    The 24th of April is a good day to challenge all your preconceptions about what Pigs-In-A-Blanket are. Brits won't have any, because they don't think they know what Pigs-in-a-Blanket are, making this a good day for Brits to find out.
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    Anzac Day is a solemn holiday jointly shared by Australia and New Zealand. Anzac is short for Australian (and) New Zealand Army Corps.
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    The Peppercorn Ceremony is held in St George, Bermuda on the Wednesday nearest St George's Day, which day usually falls on 23rd April. The ceremony, full of pomp and circumstance, is held in King's Square in front of the limestone-block State House, starting around 11 in the morning.
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    At first blush, you might be tempted to ask who's the bright spark who picked April for Zucchini Bread Day? Well, zucchini is harvested from November to May in Australia (depending on the part of Australia), with April being bumper crop time down under. In the northern hemisphere, the reason for having Zucchini Bread Day now would be to make it at a time when you can appreciate it.
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    Pretzel Day started in 1983, announced in the House of Representatives by Congressman Robert Walker from Pennsylvania. It was re-declared as such by US Congressman Joseph Pitts of Pennsylvania, in the House of Representatives on Thursday, 26 April 2001.
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    St Zita is the patron saint of bakers, because angels reputedly baked bread for her. When she was twelve, her family secured her a place as a servant in the house of a wealthy family named Fainelli in Lucca, Italy.
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    The 28th of April is, apparently, Cracker Day. The lowly, crunchy, savoury or taste-neutral biscuit that North Americans call crackers doesn't often get much credit or attention.
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    Floralia was a Roman festival to honour the goddess of flowers, Flora. It was held from the 28th of April to the 3rd of May.
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    Cherry Blossom Day is a day in Japan. To the Japanese, viewing cherry trees in blossom is a much-loved spring activity.
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    What Shrimp Scampi means depends on where you are in the world -- but once you get past that, and hear what the dish is that's on offer, we're sure you'll be all over it, whatever the name should be. Any English-speaker from outside North America will just be completely baffled by the term Shrimp Scampi.
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    Béaltaine (aka Beltane, Beltaine) was a Celtic festival to mark the start of summer. It was celebrated throughout what is now the UK and Ireland.
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