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A Flødeboller is a Danish cookie.

It has a round, flat biscuit base, topped with a stiff dollop of egg white beaten with sugar syrup, and dipped or otherwise coated in melted chocolate.

The base can be biscuit or marzipan. The biscuit bases are baked, the marzipan ones are not.

While elsewhere in the world, similar cookies are only known as commercial items, in Denmark home recipes for Flødeboller actually float around.

You can also buy them from chocolatiers and bakeries.

You can get the egg white flavoured with various fruit purées.

Language Notes

Flødebollemeans means "cream bun" ("fløde" meaning "cream".) Aka negerbolle (negro bun) or negerkys (negro kiss).

To some Danes, Flødebolle still means a bun with actual cream, as you'd get from the bakery, and "negerboller" are cookies with egg white, as you'd make at home or buy as candy ["For mig har negerboller ikke noget med fløde at gøre. Flødeboller er noget man kun kan få hos bageren med flødeskum i - de andre med æggehvide er negerboller" http://sproget.dk/svarbase/SV00001054 Retrieved August 2010. ]

The "Ordbog over det Danske Sprog" (Dictionary of the Danish Language, Vol. 5, 1923) defines Flødeboller as buns filled with whipped cream, such as you get at the bakery. The "Dansk Husmoderleksikon" (Danish housewife Encyclopedia, Volume 1, 1953, page 684) defines them as choux pastries, with a little cream on the bottom, then filled with sweetened whipped cream and glazed with sugar or chocolate. A Danish pastry lexicon from 1948 says "Cream buns -- also used to mean Negerkys." In a 1997 supplement to the Dictionary of the Danish Language, the entry is amended to read that the word can also mean "a bun filled with whipped egg white, a cookie bottom and covered with chocolate." The "Store Danske Encyklopædi" (Great Danish Encyclopaedia, Vol. 6, 1996) says that initially Flødeboller were pastries. The "Politikens Store Nye Nudansk Ordbog" Great New contemporary Danish Dictionary, 1997) defines Flødeboller as "a sweet food consisting of a cookie bottom, covered with a fluffy, white foam of beaten egg white and sugar, and coated with chocolate." [1]


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