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Gardiniera



Gardiniera is an Italian preserve, consisted of crunchy mixed vegetables pickled in vinegar. The overall taste can be mild, or spicy.

It is served as part of a starter course, or with a salad, or with boiled meats.

The vegetables can include carrot, cauliflower, celery, onion, zucchini, etc; all are chopped up coarsely. The vinegar can be red or white wine vinegar.

Chicago-Style Gardiniera

There is a distinct American version, which hails from Chicago. It differs from the original version, in that oil replaces the vinegar.

It was evolved from the original version by Italian immigrants, becoming popular there in the 1920s. It is mostly used as a sandwich condiment, particularly on Italian beef or sausage sandwiches in Chicago, though of course has many other uses.

Chicago-Style Gardiniera may use vegetables such as bell peppers, carrots, cauliflower, celery, olives, sport peppers, red pepper flakes, etc.

The oil can be canola, olive or soybean, or a mixture.

You can buy both the Italian version and the Chicago-Style version in jars in stores.



Language Notes

"Giardiniera" means "woman gardener" in Italian.


Another Italian name for this, "Sotto aceti", means literally "under vinegar."

Pickles

Aceto Dolce; Alum; Branston Pickle and Sardine Sandwiches Recipe; Branston Pickle; Bread and Butter Pickles; Caperberries; Capers; Chow-Chow; Cocktail Onions; Cornichons; Deep-Fried Pickles; Dill Pickles; Gardiniera; Godeulppagi Kimchi; Hot-Pickled Mustard Root; Japanese Pickles; Kimchi; Lime (Chemical); Pickle Chips; Pickle Juice; Pickled Eggs; Pickled Onions; Pickled Walnuts; Pickles; Pickling Cucumbers; Pickling Lime; Pickling; Preserved Lemons; Preserved Mustard Greens; Sauerkraut; Yum Yum Pickles

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Also called:

Sotto aceti

Citation

Oulton, Randal. "Gardiniera." CooksInfo.com. Published 06 May 2011; revised 06 May 2011. Web. Accessed 12/12/2017. <http://www.cooksinfo.com/gardiniera>.

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