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German Red Rocambole Garlic



The bulbs of German Red Rocambole Garlic are 2 1/2 inches (6 cm) wide, with thin, brownish purple skin. Owing to this thin skin, which flakes off easily, it doesn't have as long a storage life as some garlic bulbs can.

There will be 8 to 12, sometimes 10 to 15, cloves with buff-coloured skin. Occasionally there will be double cloves.

The garlic has a strong, full, hot and spicy flavour.

Above ground, the plant has dark green leaves.

Mid-season harvest.

The plant can survive cold winters well.

This garlic belongs to the Rocambole sub-group of hardneck garlics.

Storage Hints

Stores for 4 to 5 months.

History Notes

German Red Rocambole Garlic originated in Germany. It was brought to Idaho in North America by immigrants.

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Rocambole Garlic

Baba Franchuk's Rocambole Garlic; Dan's Italian Rocambole Garlic; French Red Asian Garlic; French Red Garlic; German Red Rocambole Garlic; Hokkaido Zai Tai Rocambole Garlic; Israeli Garlic; Italian Purple Rocambole Garlic; Kiev Rocambole Garlic; Killarney Red Rocambole Garlic; Korean Purple Rocambole Garlic; Legacy Garlic; Marino Garlic; Montana Giant Rocambole Garlic; Morado Gigante Garlic; Mountain Rocambole Garlic; Polish Rocambole Garlic; Purple Max Rocambole Garlic; Puslinch Rocambole Garlic; Rocambole Garlics; Russian Red Rocambole Garlic; Spanish Roja Rocambole Garlic; Temptress Rocambole Garlic; Yerina Garlic; Yugoslavian Rocambole Garlic

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