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Haslet is a very dark-coloured British sausage made from pig's pluck (heart, liver and lungs.)

It can be made as a sausage or a meatloaf.

The meat is finely minced to make a forcemeat, which is then flavoured with herbs such as sage. The meat is then bound together with wheat flour or breadcrumbs, and then wrapped in caul fat.

In Wales, the mixture is more likely to be just pig's liver, along with onion and potato.

Some butchers make special versions without wheat flour for coeliacs.

In place of caul fat, you may poke in small pieces of lard here and there. Some people then wrap it in foil.

Particularly traditional in Lincolnshire, England.

Cooking Tips

You cook it by baking. Serve cold in slices.

Literature & Lore

"... and so home to dinner with my wife to a good hog's harslet, a peice of meat I love but have not eat of I think this seven year."

-- Samuel Pepys, 10th March, 1664.

Language Notes

Pronounced "hass-lett."

The world "Haslet" comes from an old French word for "entrails."

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See also:


Aberdeen Sausage; Baloney; Boudin Noir; Bratwurst Festival Day; Braunsweiger; Cured Sausages; Currywurst; Fresh Sausages; Glamorgan Sausages; Hack Pudding; Haggis; Haslet; Kochwurst; Liver Pudding; Lorne Sausage; Mortadella; Sausage Casings; Sausagemeat; Sausages; Semi-Cured Sausages; Stufatura; Tube Sausage; Zampone

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Bon mots

"It is proved by experience that, beyond five or six dozen, oysters certainly cease to be enjoyable."

-- Grimod de la Reyniere (French gastronome. 20 November 1758 - 25 December 1837)

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