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Midsummer Night


Midsummer Eve Bonfire

Midsummer Eve Bonfire
© Anne Väisänen / pixabay.com / 2015 / CC0 1.0

21 June

Still celebrated traditionally on the 24th of June, Midsummer Night now actually occurs on the 21st of June owing to how the "astronomical equinox" has shifted forward several days over the centuries.

It was a very important pagan holiday in pre-Christian times. In many cultures, it was traditional to light fires, dance around poles or fires, and leap over fires. One tradition was that if you jumped over a bonfire with the person you were sweet on, you'd be married within the year.

Traditionally, this was the time to pick green walnuts. They could be pickled, or used to make a liqueur such as Nocino.

In Germany, gooseberries begin to ripen around this time. In France, Narbonne Honey is harvested around now.

The Christian Church celebrates the birth of St John the Baptist on this day. This is a departure from their usual practice -- usually the Church celebrates Saints' martyrdom days, not births -- but celebrating his birth on this day allowed them to culturally appropriate the holiday.

In the 7th century, Christians in Flanders were admonished by Saint Eligius that there would be no further singing, dancing or leaping on this day.

Midsummer Eve Folk Dancing

Midsummer Eve Folk Dancing
© Åsa Lundqvist / pixabay.com / 2012 / CC0 1.0




Literature & Lore

"Why, this is very midsummer madness." -- William Shakespeare (23 April 1564 – 23 April 1616. Twelfth Night. Act III, Scene 4.)


Celtic wheel of the year

Celtic wheel of the year showing where Lughnasadh fits into the yearly cycle
© The Wednesday Island / wikimedia.org / 2008.

See also:

All June food days


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Citation

Oulton, Randal. "Midsummer Night." CooksInfo.com. Published 12 March 2004; revised 24 May 2009. Web. Accessed 12/15/2017. <http://www.cooksinfo.com/midsummer-night>.

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