> > > > >

Morbier Cheese



Morbier (full name Morbier du Livradois) is a mild-tasting cheese with a white pine ash layer in the middle of it.

The cheese has a golden-brown rind. Inside, it is pale yellow, and semi-firm yet creamy and supple.

It is made from unpasteurized cow's milk. The milk is heated, then curdled.

Traditionally, Morbier Cheese was made from leftover curd that wasn't wanted for other cheeses or uses. The curd was put into a mould, then ash put over it to stop it from drying out and forming a rind until the next day, when there would be more leftover curd, enough to finish filling up the mould.

Today, small producers will make the bottom layer from the evening's milk, then the top layer from the next morning's milk. It is then salted and pressed.

By law, it has to be aged a minimum of 45 days. Many, though, age it for two months. After this initial aging, it is then washed with brine, then aged another two months.

The crust becomes golden brown as it ages, and the flavour gets more complex.

Morbier Cheese is made in 11 to 18 pound (5 to 8 kg) wheels in the Savoie region of France.

Cooking Tips

Morbier Cheese melts well.

History Notes

Morbier was originally made in Morez, in the Jura mountains near the Swiss border from curd leftover from making Comté cheese, or when they didn't have enough milk to make cheese the size of a Comté wheel and dates back to at least the late 1700s.


It is uncertain how makers hit upon the idea of using ash.

Morbier Cheese received its French AOC in 2001, and its European PDO status in 2002.

Language Notes

"Morbier" means "small market town" in French.

Please share this information with your friends. They may love it.

Also called:

Fromage Morbier du Livradois (French)

See also:

Semi-Firm Cheeses

Appenzeller Cheese (Quarter Fat); Ardrahan Cheese; Asadero Cheese; Asiago Cheese; Blue Cheese; Botton Cheese; Brunost Cheese; Burrini Cheese; Buxlow Paigle; Cacetto Cheese; Caerphilly Cheese; Cantal Cheese; Carrigaline Farmhouse Cheese; Cheshire Cheese; Chèvre; Chevrot Cheese; Chihuahua Cheese; Cotherstone Cheese; Criollo Cheese; Danbo Cheese; Danish Fontina Cheese; Durrus Cheese; Edam Cheese; Farmer's Cheese; Fontal Cheese; Gamonedo Cheese; Gaperon Cheese; Grimbister Cheese; Huntsman Cheese; Jalapeño Cheese; Leerdammer Cheese; Liederkranz Cheese; Livarot Cheese; Maasdam Cheese; Manchego Cheese (Mexican); Monterey Jack Cheese; Morbier Cheese; Mozzarella Cheese; Pavé d'Auge Cheese; Pavé d'Isigny Cheese; Pavé de Berry Cheese; Penyston Cheese; Pont-l'Evêque Cheese; Quartirolo Cheese; Queso con Loroco; Ricotta Salata Cheese; Semi-Firm Cheeses; Tetilla Cheese; Vacherin Fribourgeois; Washed-Rind Cheeses; Wensleydale Cheese

Comments

You may also like:

logo

Bon mots

"Liqueurs were not lacking; but the coffee especially deserves mention. It was as clear as crystal, aromatic and wonderfully hot; but, above all, it was not handed around in those wretched vessels called cups on the left banks of the Seine, but in beautiful and capacious bowls, into which the thick lips of the reverend fathers plunged, engulfing the refreshing beverage with a noise that would have done honor to sperm-whales before a storm."

-- Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (French food writer. 1 April 1755 - 2 February 1826)

Food Calendar

food-calendar-icon
A calendar tracking what happens when in the world of food.
  • food day iconCanada Day (Today)
    Canada became a country on 1 July 1867. Formerly known as Dominion Day, today is a day for picnics, barbeques, fireworks, concerts and government-issued flags.
  • food day iconMoving Day (Today)
    Moving Day is a national tradition in Québec, where today is called the "Jour du déménagement." By custom, leases throughout the nation go from 1 July to 30 June. A very high proportion of the dwellers in Montréal are renters -- in 1998, over 250,000 people applied to have their telephone services hooked up at a new location for the 1st of July.

Myth of the Day

Myth Picture Read more >