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Poutine à la Mélasse



Poutine à la Mélasse is a pie with no top crust made in the Acadian areas of Canada.

It is somewhat like Shoofly Pie and Molasses Pie, which are also made with molasses, or Québecois Tarte au sirop d'erable , except it is made with molasses instead of maple syrup.

Like Shoofly Pie, the filling has a starch in it, which Molasses Pie doesn't. But unlike both, it has has the typically Acadian touch of cubes of lard in it.

Cooking Tips

Cubed, salted pork is boiled then roasted and set aside. In a pot, molasses is heated and when it reaches the boiling point, sugar and flour are stirred in, along with hot water and the cooked salt pork and vanilla flavouring.

This is poured into a pie shell, and baked with no top crust in an oven for about half an hour.

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See also:

Poutine

Poutine à la Mélasse; Poutine à Trou; Poutine au Pain; Poutine aux Raisins; Poutine Bouillie; Poutine Carreautée; Poutine en Sac; Poutine Glissante; Poutine Québécoise; Poutine Râpée; Poutine (Maine); Poutines Blanches

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