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Poutine Glissante



Poutine Glissante is basically a dumpling served with a sweet syrup as a dessert.

It is made from thick pastry, cut into squares, and boiled in water.

It is served with molasses or maple syrup, and sometimes cream.

History Notes

Poutine Glissante was served in Quebec at the start of the 1900s, long before Poutine came to mean a savoury dish in the popular mind. It was also made by the Métis in Western Canada.

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Poutine

Poutine à la Mélasse; Poutine à Trou; Poutine au Pain; Poutine aux Raisins; Poutine Bouillie; Poutine Carreautée; Poutine en Sac; Poutine Glissante; Poutine Québécoise; Poutine Râpée; Poutine (Maine); Poutines Blanches

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"It may not be possible to get rare roast beef -- but if you're willing to settle for well done, ask them to hold the sweetened library paste that passes for gravy."

-- Marian Burros (New York Times food critic)

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