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Rice Flour


Rice Flour

Rice Flour
© Denzil Green


Rice Flour is a flour made from pulverized brown or white rice.

White or brown Rice Flour give pretty much the same results. Rice Flour ground in Asia tends to be finer, though, and less gritty than Rice Flour milled in North America.

When used in baking, the product will be light, but crumbly and somewhat grainy or gritty.

Rice Flour does not form a gluten when you bake with it because its protein content isn't high enough.

To make Rice Flour, the rice is washed, then dried, then ground into a powder. Two methods of drying might be used: freeze-drying results in a smoother powder than air-drying.

Rice Flour is not the same as Rice Starch; nor the same as Sweet Rice Flour.

Cooking Tips

Mixing in some Tapioca Starch when you are using Rice Flour helps to make a finer mix, as does combining any liquid in the recipe with Rice Flour before you add any other ingredients.

Substitutes

Not Rice Starch. Another non-wheat flour, if avoiding wheat is your reason for using Rice Flour.


To make Rice Flour, wash rice, then soak covered in water for an hour. Drain, then spread well out on a cloth such as a tea towel or paper towel. Let dry for about 4 hours, or until rice is dry and the grains no longer stick to each other at all. Pulverize in a blender or food processor to a fine powder.


Equivalents

1 cup Rice Flour = 6 oz / 185g

Storage Hints

Store at room temperature in sealed container.


Language Notes

Called "Chalerguro" in Bengali.

See also:

Rice Flour

Brown Rice Flour; Rice Flour; Shiratamako Flour; Sweet Rice Flour

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Also called:

Farine de riz (French); Reismehl (German); Farina di riso (Italian); Harina de arroz (Spanish); Farinha de arroz (Portuguese); Chalerguro, Chawal ka atta (Indian); Joshinko (Japanese)

Citation

Oulton, Randal. "Rice Flour." CooksInfo.com. Published 07 September 2002; revised 18 February 2011. Web. Accessed 12/17/2017. <http://www.cooksinfo.com/rice-flour>.

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