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Sauce Bigarade



Sauce Bigarade is a classic French sauce which features the flavour of bitter orange. It is one of the few French sauces which can be classed as sweet and sour.

The sharpness of the bitter orange cuts through both the sweetness of the sauce, and any fatty taste of the meat (typically duck) it is served with.

The most well known use of it is in Caneton à la Bigarade (aka Duck à l'orange.) It also appears in recipes such as Truite (trout) à La Bigarade.

Classically, the sauce is based on a gastrique (carmelized sugar mixed with wine vinegar) to which is added veal stock ("blond de veau", aka "Fonds de veau") or demi-glace sauce, along with the juice and blanched rind of a bitter Seville orange.

The issue with the classic version is that either suggested base sauce to add -- "blond de veau" or demi-glace sauce -- is a major undertaking in itself that can take a day or two to prepare, and that really assumes you have underlings in a restaurant kitchen making it for you.

If you making make the sauce for Duck à l'orange, Larousse Gastronomique (1977), while acknowledging the classic base-sauce method, seems to prefer instead (listing it first before the classic method) that you instead braise the duck, and use the braising juices (simmered down) as the liquid. Gordon Ramsay suggests good quality chicken stock as the liquid.

Modern home suggestions for Sauce Bigarade often base it on a roux, skip the gastrique, and add an orange liqueur both as the sweetener and to intensify the orange flavour (Gordon Ramsay bases his on a gastrique, and rounds out his version with port instead.)

Language Notes

"Bigarade" is the French term for Seville Oranges.

Sources

New Larousse Gastronomique. Paris: Librarie Larousse. English edition 1977.


Peterson, James. Glorious French Food: A Fresh Approach to the Classics. New Jersey: John Wiley and Sons. 2002. Page 387.

Ramsay, Gordon. Traditional roast duck with sauce Bigarade. London: The Sunday Times. 24 November 2007.

See also:

French Sauces

Aillade; Aioli à la greque; Aioli; Allemande Sauce; Banquière Sauce; Béarnaise Sauce; Beurre Blanc; Brown Butter; Butter Sauce; Espagnole Sauce; French Sauces; Gastrique; Hollandaise Sauce; Madeira Sauce; Matelote Sauce; Melted Butter; Meunière Butter; Noisette Butter; Normande Sauce; Paloise Sauce; Panade à la frangipane; Parisienne Sauce; Poivrade Sauce; Provencal Sauce (cold); Provençal Sauce; Rémoulade Sauce; Russian Sauce; Sauce Béarnaise; Sauce Bigarade; Sauce Diane; Sauce Maltaise; Soubise Sauce; Tartar Sauce; Velouté Sauce; Vinaigrette; White Sauce

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Citation

Oulton, Randal. "Sauce Bigarade." CooksInfo.com. Published 16 January 2011; revised 18 February 2011. Web. Accessed 02/24/2017. <http://www.cooksinfo.com/sauce-bigarade>.

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Bon mots

"Liqueurs were not lacking; but the coffee especially deserves mention. It was as clear as crystal, aromatic and wonderfully hot; but, above all, it was not handed around in those wretched vessels called cups on the left banks of the Seine, but in beautiful and capacious bowls, into which the thick lips of the reverend fathers plunged, engulfing the refreshing beverage with a noise that would have done honor to sperm-whales before a storm."

-- Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (French food writer. 1 April 1755 - 2 February 1826)

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