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Yellowtail Jack



There is a great deal of confusion as to what kind of fish exactly a Yellowtail Jack is. That's because it's actually a group of very closely-related fish, and people in different parts of the world use the "family name" to apply to the species that they catch near them.

All members of the family have a lot in common. They have long, smooth bodies with silvery-white sides, upper backs that are bluish, yellowish fins and a stripe that is either yellowish, golden or bronze down their sides.

The flesh of members of the Yellowtail Jack family is more delicate tasting than that of other fish in the jack family. The flesh of the young fish will be a light golden colour, though a single fish will have both light and dark meat. The dark meat is red at first but turns dark brown when exposed to air.

Most Yellowtail Jack sold commercially, on a global scale in terms of sheer numbers, is farm-raised in Japan, where they prefer the taste of farm-raised Yellowtail Jack.

Sushi bars in North America often import the farm-raised Yellowtail as frozen fillets.

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Also called:

Serilola sp. (Scientific Name)

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