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Zucchetta Rampicante Squash

Zucchetta Rampicante is a summer squash.

It grows on vines that grow up to 20 to 25 feet (6 to 7 1/2 metres) long. The vines can be trained on a fence or a strong trellis.

The squash is bulbous at one end, then slender past that, even coiling around itself. It can grow up to 3 feet (1 metre) long, but can be picked anytime after it reaches 4 inches (10 cm.)

When picked at 8 to 12 inches (20 to 30 cm) long, you can use them as a zucchini. Larger, roast them as you would a winter squash. The coils only appear as the squash grows longer.

The skin is a light yellowish green ripening to green, then maturing to tan.

It has pale yellow flesh turning more orange as it matures.

The seed cavity is in the bulbous end.

It has rich, sweet flavour and holds its shape after cooking.

55 to 100 days from seed.

History Notes

Zucchetta Rampicante Squash was developed in Albenga, Liguria, Italy.

It was listed by Fearing Burr in his "Field and Garden Vegetables of America" (1863.)

Language Notes

One of the Italian names, "Tromboncino", means "little trumpet".

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Also called:

Tromba d'Albenga; Tromboncino, Zucchetta Rampicante, Zucchetta Tromba d'Albenga (Italian)

Summer Squash

Chayote; Crookneck Squash; Magda Squash; Marrow; Pattypan Squash; Scallopini Squash; Snake Gourd; Summer Squash; Tinda Gourd; Yellow Squash; Yellow Sunburst Squash; Yugoslavian Finger Fruit Squash; Zapallito de Tronco Squash; Zephyr Squash; Zucchetta Rampicante Squash; Zucchini


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