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Okara



Okara is the pulp left over from soybeans after the beans are pressed for soy milk.

The pulp is white, and looks like wet, clumped sawdust, with no flavour to speak of.

In Asia, most of it is used for livestock feed. A small amount of it is eaten by humans, increasing in times of food shortages. There are, though, a few dishes made with it. In Japan, "Unohana-iri" is Okara that is sautéed with diced vegetables, then simmered in a broth and served over rice.

For Western recipes, Okara can be added in small portions to baked goods for added nutrition.

Okara should be cooked before adding to bread recipes; the enzymes in the raw bean pulp will interfere with yeast rising.

Cooking Tips

You can steam, toast it, sauté it or simmer it.

Substitutes

Drain and press tofu overnight, then crumble it.

Nutrition

High in fibre.


79% of the protein is digestible.

Nutrition Facts
Per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Amount
Calories
77
Carbohydrate
12 g
Protein
3 g


Equivalents

1 cup of dried soybeans, after being processed for soy milk, will yield just shy of 2 cups / 10 oz of Okara

1/2 cup Okara = 2 oz / 60g
100g = 3/4 cup

Storage Hints

Store in fridge for up to 3 days, or freeze. Thaw before using.

Language Notes

"O" in Japan is an honorific, meaning something like "honourable"; "kara" means "husk."


"Kirazu" means something that cannot be cut.

"Unohana" is a tiny white flour (with the scientific name of "Deutzia scabra.")

"Tofu kasu" means "tofu residue."

The Chinese term "douzha" means "soy lees."

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Also called:

Kirazu; Soy Fines; Soy Pulp; Unohana; Okara (das) (German); Douzha (Chinese)

See also:

Soybeans

Black Soybeans; Edamame; Fermented Black Beans; Okara; Soy Bran; Soy Flour; Soy Milk; Soy Nuts; Soya Oil; Soybean Sprouts; Soybeans; Tempe; Textured Vegetable Protein

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