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Preserved Mustard Greens



Preserved Mustard Greens are a form of pickled cabbage in China, where it is called "Suan Cai", meaning literally "sour vegetable."

They are not like American mustard greens at all.

Preserved Mustard Greens are used as an ingredient in dishes, or they can be served as an appetizer. They are often eaten with congee for breakfast.

In northern China, Napa cabbage is used; in the south, they use the mustard plant called "jìe cai" ("gai choy") in Cantonese. This plant has a slightly bitter taste with a mild hint of horseradish to it.

The pickling process used to preserve the cabbage is actually a fermentation process, as is used in making Sauerkraut. The process sweetens the mustard plant leaves a bit. Whether cabbage or mustard plant leaves are used, they end up with a fair bit of their crunch left, and having a salty, sour taste.

Usually only stems and young leaves are pickled; older dark green leaves are peeled off. Otherwise, the cabbages (or mustard plants) being used are pickled whole. They are dipped into boiling water (usually), then put in a pottery jar with a brine of cold water and salt, and then a very heavy weight is placed on top so that the greens get gradually pressed down as they ferment.

Preserved Mustard Greens can be bought in vacu-paks.

Cooking Tips

Rinse in cold water before using. They will be quite salty, even when rinsed, so resist temptation to overly salt a dish.

Chop into 1 inch pieces and use as a topping for dishes, or add to dishes at the end of cooking.

To stir fry Preserved Mustard Green on its own, soak in water, then rinse, and stir fry in a stainless steel wok with vinegar and sugar (stainless steel won't react with the vinegar.)

Storage Hints

Store in unopened package in refrigerator for up to a few months.

Language Notes

Preserved Mustard Greens are called "cai chua" in Vietnamese.

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Also called:

Suan Cai; Suan cai (Chinese)

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See also:

Pickles

Aceto Dolce; Alum; Branston Pickle and Sardine Sandwiches Recipe; Branston Pickle; Bread and Butter Pickles; Caperberries; Capers; Chow-Chow; Cocktail Onions; Cornichons; Deep-Fried Pickles; Dill Pickles; Gardiniera; Godeulppagi Kimchi; Hot-Pickled Mustard Root; Japanese Pickles; Kimchi; Lime (Chemical); Pickle Chips; Pickle Juice; Pickled Eggs; Pickled Onions; Pickled Walnuts; Pickles; Pickling Cucumbers; Pickling Lime; Pickling; Preserved Lemons; Preserved Mustard Greens; Sauerkraut; Yum Yum Pickles

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