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Lamb Foreshank



Lamb Foreshank is the lower part of the front leg.

It is removed from the upper part, the shoulder. It was connected to the breast where the shoulder begins.

It has the leg bone in it, and part of the shoulder bone.

Under the skin, it is covered by a layer of fat and then fell.

It is very lean, and usually sold bone-in.

It can also be cubed for stewing, or ground.

Allow 1 per person.

Cooking Tips

Unless ground, Lamb Foreshank needs a moist cooking method to allow it low and slow cooking: braising, stewing, pot-roasting, etc.. You may wish to sear its surfaces first in a hot pan to develop surface flavour. Whole, will take about 1 1/2 hours to cook.

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Also called:

Lamb Knuckle Joints; Lamb Shin; Lamb Trotter

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