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Olallieberries



Olallieberries look like slightly long blackberries, though they are slightly tarter.

They are firm, very juicy berries with small seeds that grow on trailing canes and ripen in June and July.

Olallieberries are widely grown commercially in California and much of the crops planted are grown for use in making wine.

Cooking Tips

Olallieberries can be eaten fresh out of hand, used in preserves or pies, or in making wine.

Substitutes

Blackberries

Storage Hints

Olallieberries freeze well.

History Notes

Olallieberries are a cross between Loganberries and Youngberries. Their genes are about 2/3 blackberry and 1/3 raspberry. They were developed jointly in 1949 Corvallis, Oregon by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Oregon State University.

Language Notes

"Olallie" is an Indian word meaning "blackberry."

Dewberries

Boysenberries; Dewberries; Loganberries; Nectarberries; Olallieberries; Waldo Berries; Youngberries

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Comments


Citation

Oulton, Randal. "Olallieberries." CooksInfo.com. Published 15 June 2005; revised 02 December 2007. Web. Accessed 05/03/2016. <http://www.cooksinfo.com/olallieberries>.

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Cooking tips
Substitutes
History
Language Notes


Bon mots

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