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Thai Mortar and Pestle



Like all mortars and pestles, a Thai Mortar and Pestle ("Saak" and "Krok") is used to grind foods into a powder, and for making sauces.

There are two kinds.

One is made of non-porous granite, and is very heavy and stable. Granite ones were popularized in the West by Jamie Oliver.

The other kind, such as those made in the northeast of Thailand, are tall ones, made of clay, with a wooden pestle, used for making dishes such as green papaya salad ("som tam.")

Both range in width from 6 inches (15 cm) to 9 inches (22 cm.)


Approx. diameterApprox. inner bowl widthPestle lengthApprox. weightApprox. volume capacityFor
6" / 15 cm4 1/2" / 11 1/2 cm6" / 15 cm7lb / 3 1/4 kg1 cup / 8 oz / 250 mlGrinding
7 to 7.5" / 18 to 19 cm5" / 12 1/2 cm7" / 18 cm12 to 16 lb / 5 1/2 to 7 1/4 kg2 cups / 16 oz / 500 mlGrinding, pastes, sauces
8" / 20 cm5 1/2" / 14 cm8" / 20 cm18 lb / 8 1/4 kg3 cups / 24 oz / 750 mlGrinding, pastes, sauces
9" / 23 cm6 1/2" / 17 cm9" / 23 cm24 lb / 11 kg5 1/2 cups / 44 oz / 1 1/3 litresGrinding, pastes, sauces

Cooking Tips

To clean, rinse with warm water and if you wish, unperfumed dish soap (though that's hard to find.)



History Notes

Mortars and pestles were used in Thailand as early as the 1200s.

Language Notes

In Thai, a mortar is called "Krok"; "pestle" is called "Saak." Thais refer to them in the opposite order we do, though: thus, pestle and mortar, or, "Saak" and "Krok".

Mortar and Pestle

Metate y Metlapil; Molcajete y Tejolete; Mortar and Pestle; Samp Mortar; Suribachi; Thai Mortar and Pestle; Usu

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Citation

Oulton, Randal. "Thai Mortar and Pestle." CooksInfo.com. Published 28 May 2005; revised 20 September 2007. Web. Accessed 12/16/2017. <http://www.cooksinfo.com/thai-mortar-and-pestle>.

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