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Pickling Salt



Pickling Salt is as fine as table salt -- in fact, it is table salt, but without any additives. Iodine, and many of the anti-caking additives in our table salt, would turn pickles brown and make the brine go cloudy. The resulting pickles would be fine to eat, but unappealing and make people think there is something wrong with them.

You could also, if you wished, use Pickling Salt as a table salt.

Substitutes

You could substitute any completely pure, additive-free sea salt - but the salt branded sea salt may be more expensive. Some brands of Kosher Salt can be substituted: either the ones that have no anti-caking agents, or if they do, if it's sodium ferrocyanide (yellow prussiate of soda), as that won't affect your pickling the way other agents will.

Note that if you are using a coarser salt than Pickling Salt, use 1 cup plus 2 tbsp of the coarser salt for every cup of Pickling Salt that you need if you are measuring by volume. If you are measuring by weight, in ounces or grams, just substitute weight for weight.

But economically, you're better just getting the Pickling Salt as it is quite cheap and is sold in largish bags and boxes, which is the quantities that you'll need in preserving, anyway.

Don't substitute any of the low-sodium or salt substitutes: they might bluff your taste buds at the table, but they ain't going to fool Mother Nature when it comes to the chemical stuff that has to happen with your pickling to keep it safe.


Equivalents

1 cup = 7 3/4 oz = 220 grams

See also:

Preserving Salts

Dairy Salt; Morton's Tender Quick; Nitrite Pickling Salt; Pickling Salt; Prague Powder; Prague Powder; Saltpetre

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Also called:

Pökelsalz (German)

Citation

Oulton, Randal. "Pickling Salt." CooksInfo.com. Published 07 November 2003; revised 18 February 2011. Web. Accessed 12/14/2017. <http://www.cooksinfo.com/pickling-salt>.

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