> > > >

Poutine à Trou



Poutine à Trou are apple pastries mostly made in the Acadian area of south-east of New Brunswick in Canada.

They are balls of pastry with a hole in the top. In English, they would perhaps best be understood by referring to them as Baked Apple Dumplings.

To make them, you prepared your filling first. It is a mixture of diced apple, and raisins. Sometimes cranberries and / or nuts are added.

Then you make your crust, which is basically a pie crust made with milk instead of water, and with some baking powder added. You roll out the crust, and cut it into squares about 5 inches (13 cm) square. In the centre of each square, you put some filling, then fold up the corners and press them down and mould the pastries into a ball shape with your hand. Then turn each ball upside down on a cookie sheet, make a hole in what is now the top with your finger, and bake for about 30 minutes.

You then take them briefly out of the oven, put a teaspoon of sugar syrup (made of brown sugar simmered in some water for 5 minutes) into each one's hole at the top, then return to oven for another 10 minutes.

You serve with the leftover sugar syrup.

You can also just make one big one.

Language Notes

Poutine à Trou are sometimes also called "Poutine routies" (meaning "roasted poutines") because they are baked.


"Trou" means "hole", referring to the hole in the top.

Please share this information with your friends. They may love it.

Poutine

Poutine à la Mélasse; Poutine à Trou; Poutine au Pain; Poutine aux Raisins; Poutine Bouillie; Poutine Carreautée; Poutine en Sac; Poutine Glissante; Poutine Québécoise; Poutine Râpée; Poutine (Maine); Poutines Blanches

Comments

You may also like:

logo

Bon mots

"There is nothing which has yet been contrived by man, by which so much happiness is produced as by a good tavern or inn; a tavern chair is the throne of human felicity."

-- Samuel Johnson (English writer. 18 September 1709 – 13 December 1784)

Food Calendar

food-calendar-icon
A calendar tracking what happens when in the world of food.
  • food day iconCanada Day (Today)
    Canada became a country on 1 July 1867. Formerly known as Dominion Day, today is a day for picnics, barbeques, fireworks, concerts and government-issued flags.
  • food day iconMoving Day (Today)
    Moving Day is a national tradition in Québec, where today is called the "Jour du déménagement." By custom, leases throughout the nation go from 1 July to 30 June. A very high proportion of the dwellers in Montréal are renters -- in 1998, over 250,000 people applied to have their telephone services hooked up at a new location for the 1st of July.

Myth of the Day

Myth Picture Read more >