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Poutine à Trou



Poutine à Trou are apple pastries mostly made in the Acadian area of south-east of New Brunswick in Canada.

They are balls of pastry with a hole in the top. In English, they would perhaps best be understood by referring to them as Baked Apple Dumplings.

To make them, you prepared your filling first. It is a mixture of diced apple, and raisins. Sometimes cranberries and / or nuts are added.

Then you make your crust, which is basically a pie crust made with milk instead of water, and with some baking powder added. You roll out the crust, and cut it into squares about 5 inches (13 cm) square. In the centre of each square, you put some filling, then fold up the corners and press them down and mould the pastries into a ball shape with your hand. Then turn each ball upside down on a cookie sheet, make a hole in what is now the top with your finger, and bake for about 30 minutes.

You then take them briefly out of the oven, put a teaspoon of sugar syrup (made of brown sugar simmered in some water for 5 minutes) into each one's hole at the top, then return to oven for another 10 minutes.

You serve with the leftover sugar syrup.

You can also just make one big one.

Language Notes

Poutine à Trou are sometimes also called "Poutine routies" (meaning "roasted poutines") because they are baked.


"Trou" means "hole", referring to the hole in the top.

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Poutine

Poutine à la Mélasse; Poutine à Trou; Poutine au Pain; Poutine aux Raisins; Poutine Bouillie; Poutine Carreautée; Poutine en Sac; Poutine Glissante; Poutine Québécoise; Poutine Râpée; Poutine (Maine); Poutines Blanches

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"I devoured hot-dogs in Baltimore 'way back in 1886, and they were then very far from newfangled...They contained precisely the same rubber, indigestible pseudo-sausages that millions of Americans now eat, and they leaked the same flabby, puerile mustard. Their single point of difference lay in the fact that their covers were honest German Wecke made of wheat-flour baked to crispiness, and not the soggy rolls prevailing today, of ground acorns, plaster-of-Paris, flecks of bath-sponge, and atmospheric air all compact."

-- Henry Louis Mencken (American writer. 12 September 1880 – 29 January 1956)

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