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Poutine au Pain



Poutine au Pain means "bread pudding" in Québecois and Acadian French.

Like Bread Pudding in English, there is no one set recipe, but rather many.

Language Notes

"Poutine au Pain" is probably an anglicisme ("English-influenced expression") that passed into Québecois in the early 1900s. Mentioned in Roger Lemelin's 1948 novel Les Plouffe (The Plouffe Family) about a family in Québec City's poorer Lower Town during the Depression and the ensuing Second World War. The term would have had to be common for some time before that for it to be picked up by Lemelin as a normal expression for a working-class family.


- Poléon! T'as pas mangé ta poutine au pain. (Poleon, you haven't eaten your bread pudding).
- Pas faim, m'man. (I'm not hungry, mum).

The term is also common in Acadian French.

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Bon mots

"But some of us are beginning to pull well away, in our irritation, from... the exquisite tasters, the vintage snobs, the three-star Michelin gourmets. There is, we feel, a decent area somewhere between boiled carrots and Beluga caviar, sour plonk and Chateau Lafitte, where we can take care of our gullets and bellies without worshipping them."

-- J.B. Priestley (English writer. 13 September 1894 - 14 August 1984)

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