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Stone Mushrooms

Stone Mushrooms start off looking like small rocks, then their caps become antler-shaped, then the caps open up into flattened funnel shapes.

They grow from tubers. In the wild, they grow on parts of decaying trees in the ground. The tubers themselves are not edible (they contain dirt.)

The tubers can be planted in pots at home, providing a steady supply of the mushrooms

There are pores under the cap instead of gills.

They have mild flavour and good texture.

These are not the same as what Koreans call "stone mushrooms" -- those are the mushrooms that the Chinese call "Cloud Ear Mushrooms"

"Stone Mushrooms" is sometimes also used to describe "Staddle Stones" -- mushroom-shaped supports made out of stone used to raise food-storage buildings such as granaries or larders off the ground, to keep them away from the away and from rats on the ground.

Cooking Tips

Soak dry ones in water until soft, then use.

History Notes

In the 1400s in Italy, it was believed that this mushroom grew from rocks which were fossilized lynx urine.

Language Notes

In Korea, "Stone Mushrooms" is used as another name for Cloud Ear Mushrooms; in Germany, it is used as another name for porcini mushrooms. In Britain, "stone mushrooms" is also another name for "staddle stones", foundation stones which were used to keep barns and grain stores up off the ground and a bit less vulnerable to vermin.

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Also called:

Polyporus tuberaster (Scientific Name); Sklerotien-Stielporling, Steinpilze (German); Pietra Fungaia (Italian); Tamacyoreitake (Japanese)

Wild Mushrooms

Beefsteak Mushrooms; Blewit Mushrooms; Branched Oyster Fungus; Chanterelle Mushrooms; Chicken-of-the-Woods Mushrooms; False Morels; Field Mushrooms; Granulated Bolete Mushrooms; Hedgehog Mushrooms; Honey Mushrooms; Horse Mushrooms; King Trumpet Mushrooms; Lion's Mane Mushrooms; Lobster Mushrooms; Matsutake Mushrooms; Morel Mushrooms; Mousseron Mushrooms; Nametake Mushrooms; Oronge Mushrooms; Porcini Mushrooms; Puff Ball Mushrooms; Slippery Jack Mushrooms; St George's Mushrooms; Stone Mushrooms; Wild Mushrooms; Wine Cap Mushrooms


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